Docphish

This is Docphish's re-post blog...
visualizingmath:

Submitted by Manuvstheworld:

Fanfiction, Graphs, and PageRank
On a website called fanfiction.net, users write millions of stories about their favorite stories. They have diverse opinions about them. They love some stories, and hate others. The opinions are noisy, and it’s hard to see the big picture.
With tools from mathematics and some helpful software, however, we can visualize the underlying structure.
In the following post, we will visualize the Harry Potter, Naruto and Twilight fandoms on fanfiction.net. We will also use Google’s PageRank algorithm to rank stories, and perform collaborative filtering to make story recommendations to top fanfiction.net users.
If you’re not interested in the details, you can skip to the following:
Interactive Graphs: Harry Potter, Naruto, Twilight
Story Rankings: Harry Potter, Naruto, Twilight
Story Recommendations: Harry Potter, Naruto, Twilight
And of course, you might skim below to see the pretty pictures!
[MORE]

I recently started watching a television show called Numbers, and this interesting use of mathematics to create cool and useful software reminds me of that show. 

visualizingmath:

Submitted by Manuvstheworld:

Fanfiction, Graphs, and PageRank

On a website called fanfiction.net, users write millions of stories about their favorite stories. They have diverse opinions about them. They love some stories, and hate others. The opinions are noisy, and it’s hard to see the big picture.

With tools from mathematics and some helpful software, however, we can visualize the underlying structure.

In the following post, we will visualize the Harry Potter, Naruto and Twilight fandoms on fanfiction.net. We will also use Google’s PageRank algorithm to rank stories, and perform collaborative filtering to make story recommendations to top fanfiction.net users.

If you’re not interested in the details, you can skip to the following:

Interactive GraphsHarry PotterNarutoTwilight

Story RankingsHarry PotterNarutoTwilight

Story RecommendationsHarry PotterNarutoTwilight

And of course, you might skim below to see the pretty pictures!

[MORE]

I recently started watching a television show called Numbers, and this interesting use of mathematics to create cool and useful software reminds me of that show. 

bobbycaputo:

The Toxic Landscape of Johannesburg’s Gold Mines

More than a century of gold mining has left towering piles of bleached mine waste, known as “tailings,” throughout Johannesburg’s landscape. The discovery of gold in 1886 led to it’s founding and transformed a small, isolated farming community into South Africa’s largest city. The extraction industry has been part of Johannesburg’s identity ever since, and the mountainous dumps have been a feature of the city so long that locals barely notice them.

“The tailings are the visual foundations of this important city,” says photographerJason Larkin whose project Tales From The City Of Gold digs into social, political and economic forces rooted in the 19th century. “I don’t think many residents even think of them as being made by hand. They see them as just part of the ‘natural’ backdrop to the city.”

But they’re more than scenery. They may be a toxic time bomb.

(Continue Reading)

dynamicafrica:

Seven Amazing Photographs That Show Urban Johannesburg Then and Now.

It’s been 20 years since South Africa transitioned from a segregated apartheid state to a democratic nation. Depending on who you ask, much has changed, but much more has stayed the same. However, what you cannot dispute is the physical change that has occurred in the make up of some of the country’s larger cities like Johannesburg, the economic capital.

Here are seven amazing photographs of the Jozi Central Business District (CBD) that show Johannesburg then and now.

Photography by: Roxanne Henderson and Pericles Anetos.

(source)

emergentfutures:

Researchers Test Personal Data Market to Find Out How Much Your Information Is Worth


If you could sell your location data every day, how much would you charge? A research team has carried out an experiment to find out.


Full Story: Technology Review

emergentfutures:

Researchers Test Personal Data Market to Find Out How Much Your Information Is Worth

If you could sell your location data every day, how much would you charge? A research team has carried out an experiment to find out.

Full Story: Technology Review

emergentfutures:

The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data


Facebook and other social networking sites aren’t free. They don’t charge you money to connect with friends, upload photos, and “like” your favorite bands and businesses, but you still pay. You pay with your personal data, which these service use to target ads.
For Citizenme, the price you pay is much higher, and it’s trying to shift internet economics back in your direction. The long-term plan is to provide a way for you to sell your own online data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing. But it isn’t there just yet. In the meantime, it’s focused on helping you collect and analyze your social media data through a mobile app that connects to multiple social networks—giving you more insight into how things work today. “The very first step is raising awareness, helping people understand what’s being done with their data,” says Citizenme founder StJohn Deakins.


Full Story: Wired

emergentfutures:

The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data

Facebook and other social networking sites aren’t free. They don’t charge you money to connect with friends, upload photos, and “like” your favorite bands and businesses, but you still pay. You pay with your personal data, which these service use to target ads.

For Citizenme, the price you pay is much higher, and it’s trying to shift internet economics back in your direction. The long-term plan is to provide a way for you to sell your own online data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing. But it isn’t there just yet. In the meantime, it’s focused on helping you collect and analyze your social media data through a mobile app that connects to multiple social networks—giving you more insight into how things work today. “The very first step is raising awareness, helping people understand what’s being done with their data,” says Citizenme founder StJohn Deakins.

Full Story: Wired

mathmajik:

"While fractal geometry is often used in high-tech science, its patterns are surprisingly common in traditional African designs," said Ron Eglash, senior lecturer in comparative studies in the humanities. Eglash is author of African Fractals: Modern Computing and Indigenous Design (Rutgers University Press, 1999).

Eglash said his work suggests that African mathematics is more complex than previously thought. He also says using African fractals in U.S. classrooms may boost interest in math among students, particularly African Americans. He has developed a Web page to help teachers use fractal geometry in the classroom. (http://www.cohums.ohio-state.edu/comp/eglash.dir/afractal.htm)

Fractals are geometric patterns that repeat on ever-shrinking scales. Many natural objects, like ferns, tree branches, and lung bronchial systems are shaped like fractals. Fractals can also be seen in many of the swirling patterns produced by computer graphics, and have become an important new tool for modeling in biology, geology, and other natural sciences.

In African Fractals, Eglash discusses fractal patterns that appear in widespread components of indigenous African culture, from braided hairstyles and kente cloth to counting systems and the design of homes and settlements.

Sources: csdt.rpi.edu aziarts.com theskylinedesigngroup.wordpress.com leahchappel.wordpress.com

(via visualizingmath)

futurescope:

Philip K. Dick Android Project

In 2004/05 a few fans recreated Dick in the form of a remote-controlled android. If you want to know more, head over to PKAndroid.

vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians
With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.
But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.
I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.
Why the name?Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.
Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.
I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.
Continue

vicemag:

This 16-Year-Old Made an App That Exposes Sellout Politicians

With US politics swimming in so much corporate money that it’s pretty much an oligarchy, it can be hard to keep track of which particular set of lobbyists is trying to milk more cash out of healthcare, fossil fuels and other very important issues from one week to the next.

But thanks to 16-year-old Nick Rubin, keeping track of just how much politicians have sold out has become a lot easier. He created Greenhouse, a new browser plugin which operates under the motto, “Some are red. Some are blue. All are green.” The plugin aims “to shine light on a social and industrial disease of today: the undue influence of money in our Congress.” It sounds like a bit of a lofty aim for an app, but it’s actually pretty simple and effective—it provides a break down of a politician’s campaign contributions when that politician’s name comes up in an article. It is currently available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari and is completely free. As you can imagine, reading about how your Member of Congress voted in a recent health bill becomes all the more enlightening if you know how much money the health industry showered him in at the last election.

I spoke to Nick Rubin about the plugin, politics and what he calls the “money stories” behind what you read in the news.

VICE: Hi Nick. So how did you come up with the idea for Greenhouse?
Nick Rubin: Back in seventh grade, I gave a presentation on corporate personhood and ever since then I’ve been really interested in that issue. I think the one problem is that the sources of income for members of congress haven’t been simple and easily accessible when people have needed it. More recently, I’ve been teaching myself how to code and I thought that something like Greenhouse that puts the data at people’s fingertips would be a perfect solution. It really is the intersection of these two passions of mine—coding and politics. I made it after school and on weekends on my computer.

Why the name?
Well, green is the color of money in the US, and house refers to the two houses of Congress [the Senate and House of Representatives]. The name also implies transparency; greenhouses are see through and they are built to help things thrive.

Where did you get the information on the politician’s donations?
It uses the data from the last full election cycle which was 2012. This is simply because it’s just the most complete set of data that we have. But, the browser does provide access to the most up to date 2014 information by just clicking the name of the politician on the top of the window or theOpenSecrets.org link in the popup. So the 2014 data is just one click away.

I’m intending to update the data as a whole later in the election cycle as the 2014 contributions are more complete. These are updates I’m currently working on, as well as thinking of other ways I can expand the tool.

Continue

kateoplis:

"It’s so completely absurd, if it wasn’t so tragic."
—Professor Lessig
Streaming now on Amazon, iTunes, and Vudu. You have no excuse.  

kateoplis:

"It’s so completely absurd, if it wasn’t so tragic."

Professor Lessig

Streaming now on Amazon, iTunes, and Vudu. You have no excuse.