Docphish

This is Docphish's re-post blog...
mashable:

fastcompany:

Watch The Evolution Of The iPhone From The Original To The 6 In One GIF
The iPhone 6 is already in the palms of many of the people reading this right now, who are following these words on a satisfyingly large screen, setting off a thin and lightweight body almost like air in the hands. The new phone is a technological marvel—and, as this GIF makes clear, it’s merely the latest in the evolution of a technological marvel that began in the summer of 2007.
Read More>

Mesmerizing!

mashable:

fastcompany:

Watch The Evolution Of The iPhone From The Original To The 6 In One GIF

The iPhone 6 is already in the palms of many of the people reading this right now, who are following these words on a satisfyingly large screen, setting off a thin and lightweight body almost like air in the hands. The new phone is a technological marvel—and, as this GIF makes clear, it’s merely the latest in the evolution of a technological marvel that began in the summer of 2007.

Read More>

Mesmerizing!

designculturemind:

When machines outsmart humans By Nick Bostrom, cnn.com
Editor’s note: Nick Bostrom is professor and director of the Future of Humanity Institute at the Oxford Martin School at Oxford University. He is the author of “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies” (OUP). The opinions expressed in thi…
The next stop from human level intelligence, just a short distance farther along the tracks, is machine superintelligence. The train might not even decelerate at Humanville Station: It is likely instead to swoosh right past.
This brings us to what I think may well be the most important task of our time. If there will eventually be an “intelligence explosion,” how exactly can we set up the initial conditions so as to achieve an outcome that is survivable and beneficial to existing persons?

designculturemind:

When machines outsmart humans
By Nick Bostrom, cnn.com

Editor’s note: Nick Bostrom is professor and director of the Future of Humanity Institute at the Oxford Martin School at Oxford University. He is the author of “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies” (OUP). The opinions expressed in thi…

The next stop from human level intelligence, just a short distance farther along the tracks, is machine superintelligence. The train might not even decelerate at Humanville Station: It is likely instead to swoosh right past.

This brings us to what I think may well be the most important task of our time. If there will eventually be an “intelligence explosion,” how exactly can we set up the initial conditions so as to achieve an outcome that is survivable and beneficial to existing persons?

(Source: futuramb, via futurescope)

Announcing Code Studio!

codeorg:

I’m proud to announce the launch of Code Studio, Code.org’s new open-source learning platform designed to teach students the basics of computer science, starting as early as kindergarten.

The Code.org vision is to bring computer science to every student in every school and today marks our…

centralparknyc:


Huge thanks to nyprarchives for unearthing this amazing audio tour to Central Park from 1971. While many things have changed, many more have stayed the same. This audio guide was created by Pan Am Airlines and came with an accompanying map. If you’d like to recreate the experience with modern technology, download our mobile app for iOs or Android. Our star-studded audio tour and in-app map means you have no need for an extra map you have to struggle to fold!
And if anyone has a copy of the original map, let us know in the comments below, or send a note to the New York Public Radio archivists. We’d love to see it!

centralparknyc:

Huge thanks to nyprarchives for unearthing this amazing audio tour to Central Park from 1971. While many things have changed, many more have stayed the same. This audio guide was created by Pan Am Airlines and came with an accompanying map. If you’d like to recreate the experience with modern technology, download our mobile app for iOs or Android. Our star-studded audio tour and in-app map means you have no need for an extra map you have to struggle to fold!

And if anyone has a copy of the original map, let us know in the comments below, or send a note to the New York Public Radio archivists. We’d love to see it!

cjwho:

Floating in the Sky - Manhattan’s Secret Pools and Gardens | via

High above the sweaty streets lies Manhattan’s most hidden luxury: the rooftop pool.

In New York City, it’s always about numbers. The Department of Environmental Protection has picked some 1,700 municipal-owned properties — 500 schools, 600 comfort stations, 10 housing projects, 400 spray showers and 87 parks among them — to help the city cut back on water use. For locals nobly struggling to conserve resources, there is also this number to make them steam: $7.5 million. That’s the asking price for a four-bedroom apartment in Franklin Place, a luxury condo development in TriBeCa with a rooftop pool.

You wouldn’t know it, but they’re up there — those turquoise oases, invisible to those of us who cope each day with sour summer smells, sweltering subway platforms and scorching sidewalks. More than any other city, New York converts the graph of its income inequality into a vertical urban plan, with most people spread out at street level — conniving to linger for just one extra second before an air-conditioned storefront when its door swings open — and the lucky few in their secret aeries and tiny triangle bikinis, lolling poolside.

Once upon a time, relief from summer in the city meant a vandalized fire hydrant or a snooze on the fire escape. When I was growing up in New York, the closest thing to a rooftop pool was dropping water balloons onto friends from my second-story window, before trading places so they could drop them on me. Rooftops were deserts of sticky blacktop, the last places to which any sane New Yorker would retreat. And rooftop pools were as exotic as soccer fans. But now they’re proliferating as come-ons for condos and hotels — whose developers, truth be told, would probably prefer erecting more lucrative penthouses but must occasionally meet bothersome green requirements. Landscaped pools help turn those requirements to their advantage.

Are we jealous? The pools are utilitarian, occasionally clumsy architecture, mostly devised to maintain an aura of exclusivity. The real estate market thrives on amenity envy. And yet, envy aside, there is something deliciously voyeuristic about helicopter photographs of a suddenly unfamiliar, upturned cityscape dotted with David Hockney bathers in dappled water and lounge chairs. Those chairs come with their own numbers. The Dream Downtown, a hotel in the Meatpacking District, charges $175 a day to use the pool, Monday through Thursday. A cabana on the weekend will set you back at least $2,500.

Text: Michael Kimmelman
Photography: George Steinmetz

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