Docphish

This is Docphish's re-post blog...

Celebrity Novels, Reviewed

vicemag:

It’s easy to write a novel: Just keep typing until you have something that is very long and mostly lies. But getting that mess published is another beast entirely—unless you are famous, in which case your every utterance is assumed to be worth printing. As a result, there are a ton of…

(Source: Vice Magazine)

futurescope:

Our Work Here is Done: Visions of a Robot Economy
Great e-book from NESTA UK on the impact of robotics on economies, politics and governments.

This book looks at the phenomenon of new robot technologies, asks what impact they might have on the economy, and considers how governments, businesses and individuals should respond to them. - See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/our-work-here-done-visions-robot-economy#sthash.tkQlAJcw.E6nhvDBZ.dpuf

Book chapters
The economics of a robot future
Technological possibilities
Robots of the past and of the future
Robots and justice
Not long ago, this worry was the stuff of science fiction. Now, as self–driving cars take to the streets and robots fill our warehouses and factories, it is entering mainstream political debate around the world.
This raises important questions for all of us. How society uses new technologies is not a foregone conclusion. It depends on political decisions, cultural norms and economic choices as much as on the technologies themselves.
This book features views from a range of disciplines, including economics, engineering, history, philosophy and innovation studies.
EditorStian Westlake
ContributorsRyan Avent, Frances Coppola, Frederick Guy, Nick Hawes, Izabella Kaminska, Tess Reidy, Edward Skidelsky, Noah Smith, E. R. Truitt, Jon Turney, Georgina Voss, Steve Randy Waldman and Alan Winfield



[read more & download it on nesta.org.uk]

futurescope:

Our Work Here is Done: Visions of a Robot Economy

Great e-book from NESTA UK on the impact of robotics on economies, politics and governments.

This book looks at the phenomenon of new robot technologies, asks what impact they might have on the economy, and considers how governments, businesses and individuals should respond to them. - See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/our-work-here-done-visions-robot-economy#sthash.tkQlAJcw.E6nhvDBZ.dpuf

Book chapters

  • The economics of a robot future
  • Technological possibilities
  • Robots of the past and of the future
  • Robots and justice

Not long ago, this worry was the stuff of science fiction. Now, as self–driving cars take to the streets and robots fill our warehouses and factories, it is entering mainstream political debate around the world.

This raises important questions for all of us. How society uses new technologies is not a foregone conclusion. It depends on political decisions, cultural norms and economic choices as much as on the technologies themselves.

This book features views from a range of disciplines, including economics, engineering, history, philosophy and innovation studies.

Editor
Stian Westlake

Contributors
Ryan Avent, Frances Coppola, Frederick Guy, Nick Hawes, Izabella Kaminska, Tess Reidy, Edward Skidelsky, Noah Smith, E. R. Truitt, Jon Turney, Georgina Voss, Steve Randy Waldman and Alan Winfield

futurescope:

Poppy Project: Time lapse of Poppy’s assembly

The Poppy project aims at building an open source humanoid robot and an interdisciplinary community to promote Science, Art and Education.
This video was shot during the assembly of our last Poppy. The actual duration of this assembly was around 7 hours.

The final choreography has been done during the “Êtres et numérique” residency. The code which makes move the robot is available on Github: bit.ly/TJOpGS
You can watch the performance video on vimeo.com/92281019; more information is available on our forum (forum.poppy-project.org/t/artist-residency-etres-et-numerique).

More info on
poppy-project.org
forum.poppy-project.org
github.com/poppy-project

Music crédit:
Four Tet - Moma : soundcloud.com/four-tet/four-tet-moma
Buy it on itunes (bit.ly/1igIb6u) or amazon (amzn.to/1mmOnOr).

(via emergentfutures)

futurescope:

Poppy Project: Time lapse of Poppy’s assembly

The Poppy project aims at building an open source humanoid robot and an interdisciplinary community to promote Science, Art and Education.
This video was shot during the assembly of our last Poppy. The actual duration of this assembly was around 7 hours.

The final choreography has been done during the “Êtres et numérique” residency. The code which makes move the robot is available on Github: bit.ly/TJOpGS
You can watch the performance video on vimeo.com/92281019; more information is available on our forum (forum.poppy-project.org/t/artist-residency-etres-et-numerique).

More info on
poppy-project.org
forum.poppy-project.org
github.com/poppy-project

Music crédit:
Four Tet - Moma : soundcloud.com/four-tet/four-tet-moma
Buy it on itunes (bit.ly/1igIb6u) or amazon (amzn.to/1mmOnOr).

(via emergentfutures)

futurescope:

Open Ephys: Neuroscientists Join the Open-Source Hardware Movement

From IEEE:

Graduate students Josh Siegle and Jakob Voigts were planning an ambitious series of experiments at their MIT neuroscience labs in 2011 when they ran into a problem. They needed to record complex brain signals from mice, but they couldn’t afford the right equipment: The recording systems cost upward of US $60,000 each, and they wanted at least four. So they decided to solve their dilemma by building their own gear on the cheap. And knowing that they wouldn’t be the last neuroscientists to encounter such a problem, they decided to give away their designs. Now their project, Open Ephys, is the hub of a nascent open-source hardware community for neural technology.

[Open Ephys] [read more at IEEE] [pictures by Open Ephys]

(via emergentfutures)